NADIOC Week Prayer

In the spirit of reconciliation, we acknowledge the Bunurong and Boon Wurrung peoples of the Kulin Nation as traditional custodians of this land. We pay our respects to the Elders both past, present and emerging.

Let us face the west…

As the sun travels across the sky and sets in glory in the west, this direction represents strength  for the people of the future. The Kookaburra, the first of the birds, sings the sun to rest. The West represents hope for the future and strength for they people. Sure in the knowledge that the sun it puts to bed will rise again bringing with it renewed hope and energy. The Kookaburra flies true and straight, sure of its purpose and its goal. So we look to the west with hopes and dreams of peace to move into our future. From the west comes the promise of gentle sleep, reflection, contentment and rest from our labour.

Thank you for the gifts of the West

 

Let us face the north…

The North represents the wisdom of the ancient sources from the past. The stream from the North represents the ancient wisdom of the Christians who came to Australia. The symbol of the North is the Kangaroo. It was a source of life for many Aboriginal people and a reminder of ancestral beings and creation. The Kangaroo has become a national symbol for all who now live in this country; a symbol of uniqueness, strength, endurance and abundance. The land is like the scriptures in that it speaks to us through sacred stories and signs that are inscribed in the landscape and in the animals who inhabit it. Wisdom comes through reflection.

Thank you for the gifts of the North

 

Let us face the south…

The South represents truth from within, insights from Aboriginal culture. Truths can be discovered in the land, the stories, the teachings, the history and the ceremonies. The insights reveal the presence of the Creator Spirit. The symbol of the south is the emu. A bird that tracks the land and who searches with intense curiosity. It is in searching one’s experience and culture that one discovers the tracks of God in our past and present. The south cross hangs over Australia in blessing and protection for our Nation.

Thank you for the gifts of the South

 

Let us face the East…

The symbol of the east is the Magpie, which announces the coming of the sun at dawn. The magpie symbolizes the Good News and is our symbol here of a new day dawning for us and for the Church. Aboriginal people get their bearings from the East. In Aboriginal way, the East rather than the north orientates people as they travel the land. Christ is our morning star. As the sun rises in the East with a promise of a new day so Christ is our guiding light through the message of the Gospel leading us throughout the day so we look forward in Hope.

Thank you for the gifts of the East

 

Australian blessing

May you always stand as tall as a tree,

Be as strong as the rock Uluru,

Be as gentle as the morning mist, 

Hold the warmth of the sacred campfire within you,

And may the spirits of our ancestors always watch over you. 

ALL: Amen

© E. Pike

 

Source: Helen Christensen, Catholic Education Melbourne 

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